Deno is a secure, modern JavaScript and TypeScript runtime. It is created by the same developer who created Node.js, Ryan Dahl. Deno is built on the same V8 JavaScript engine as Node.js, but it provides an improved security model, better performance, and a more robust standard library. Deno also supports TypeScript, allowing developers to write their code in a type-safe language, which can then be compiled down to JavaScript for execution. Deno is designed to be a lightweight, secure, and efficient way to develop web applications.
React Day Berlin 2023React Day Berlin 2023
30 min
Javascript Should Come With Batteries
Setting up JavaScript projects is no fun. Getting started involves installing and configuring node, tsc, prettier, eslint, a testing framework, a database driver, and more. Why is JavaScript not batteries included? In this talk we'll talk about how Deno fixes this, letting you focus on building stuff. We explore what benefits full tooling integration unlocks, and remember how fun it is to program if your tools help you, rather than requiring your babysitting.
Node Congress 2023Node Congress 2023
29 min
Bun, Deno, Node.js? Recreating a JavaScript runtime from Scratch - Understand magic behind Node.js
Bun, Deno, and many other JavaScript runtimes have been hyped, but do you know why? Is it that easy to make a runtime from scratch?

I've been researching the secret behind Node.js' power and why there are so many new JavaScript runtimes coming up. Breaking down each key component used on Node.js I've come to interesting conclusions that many people used to say whereas in practice it works a bit differently.

In this talk, attendees will learn the concepts used to create a new JavaScript runtime. They're going to go through an example of how to make a JavaScript runtime by following what's behind the scenes on the Node.js project using C++. They'll learn the relationship between Chrome's V8 and Libuv and what makes one JavaScript runtime better than others.

This talk will cover the following topics:
- What's a JavaScript Engine - V8
- Why Node.js uses Libuv
- How to create a JS Runtime from scratch
Node Congress 2023Node Congress 2023
36 min
Deno 2.0
Deno 2.0 is imminent and it's bringing some big changes to the JavaScript runtime. In this talk, we'll introduce the new features including import maps, package.json auto-discovery, and bare specifiers. We'll discuss how these improvements will help address issues like duplicate dependencies and disappearing dependencies. Additionally, we'll delve into the built-in support for deno: specifiers on the deno.land/x registry and its role in providing a recommended path for publishing. Come learn about how these updates will shape the future of the JavaScript ecosystem and improve backwards compatibility with Node applications.
JSNation 2022JSNation 2022
22 min
An Introduction to Deno for Node.js Developers
Deno and Node.js have a lot in common. They are both non-browser JavaScript runtimes built on the V8 engine. Deno and Node.js are also different in a lot of ways: TypeScript, CommonJS, package management, permission systems, tooling, native addons, browser compatibility. This talk will compare and contrast the two runtimes, focusing on what experienced Node.js developers need to know in order to succeed with Deno.
TypeScript Congress 2022TypeScript Congress 2022
25 min
Writing universal modules for Deno, Node, and the browser
This talk will walk you through writing a module in TypeScript that can be consumed by users of Deno, Node, and browsers. I will walk through how to set up formatting, linting, and testing in Deno, and then how to publish your module to deno.land/x and npm. I will also start out with a quick introduction on what Deno is.
DevOps.js Conf 2022DevOps.js Conf 2022
31 min
Experimenting with Deno for Easier Kubernetes Deployments
As we all know, dealing with Kubernetes YAML is not very intuitive (especially for those just getting starting) and the more resources and dependencies are added the messier and more complex the process becomes. In this talk, we'll explore how we can use Typescript and Deno to bring typing, composition, code-reuse, and testing as an alternative to YAML - that doesn't include these capabilities, all while still remaining declarative and easy to use.