Cat Johnson

Cat Johnson

I am a Senior Frontend Engineer at Khan Academy and I’ve been working in the industry for over 6 years. During my day job I work mostly on React web components and focus on Accessible Technology. On my off hours I love talking about how to create more accessible and inclusive web applications and hosting a podcast discussing new technology creating positive social impact in our world today. I firmly believe technology can be used to create a more inclusive and equitable world as long as we keep it in check.
Nested Interactive Elements: A Nightmare in Accessibility
React Summit 2024React Summit 2024
Jun 17, 22:00
Nested Interactive Elements: A Nightmare in Accessibility
There have been numerous remarkable new UX experiences developed over the years, such as cards displaying an array of products and clickable list items with dynamic menu options, among others. However, only a few are aware of the challenges involved in building structures with nested interactive elements, and unfortunately, some of them are completely inaccessible. 
In today's talk, we will explore some of these prevalent web UX patterns and delve into the hidden challenges they present. While we may be able to mitigate some of these issues, others serve as cautionary tales in accessibility.
Nested Interactive Elements: An Nightmare in Accessibility
React Advanced Conference 2023React Advanced Conference 2023
23 min
Nested Interactive Elements: An Nightmare in Accessibility
There have been numerous remarkable new UX experiences developed over the years, such as cards displaying an array of products and clickable list items with dynamic menu options, among others. However, only a few are aware of the challenges involved in building these structures with accessibility in mind, and unfortunately, some of them are completely inaccessible. 
In today's talk, we will explore some of these prevalent web UX patterns and delve into the hidden challenges they present. While we may be able to mitigate some of these issues, others serve as cautionary tales in accessibility.